Anything Goes With My 3 Favourite Veggies Of The Sea

It was just last month I said in passing; “I miss performing in musicals, I just want to go back and do it all over again.” And just like that, I found myself back in highschool!

Anything goes

Photo by Nick Mirka of Mitchell Reilly Pictures

~*~

I was nostalgically cast away on stage for an alumni number with fellow leads from previous years in the musical theatre performance of “Anything Goes.” And what a surreal experience it was!

Did you SEA it?

Whether you had front row seats or are just catching word of this now, a cheeky post had to follow and in the spirit of World Water Day, what better way than to hit on the high notes of sea veggies?

Rich in iodine for thyroid health, containing nearly all of the minerals present in the ocean (many of the same minerals found in human blood), and potent in antioxidants, if these aren’t yet a part of your daily diet, they should be!

Here is everything you need to know to incorporate my 3 favourite veggies of the sea:

dulse

DULSE

  • We first stumbled upon this on our road trip to the Grand Manan Islands in New Brunswick. Fresh dulse was spread over tarps in long rows across the ground to dry out. There was a local gift shop where I purchased this dulse in dried strips, flakes, and even made into hard candy.
  • What it is: Dulce is technically a red seaweed though it can appear purple and resembles red, leafy lettuce.
  • How To Use It: With a salty taste, and a sea-like flavour, it creates a wonderful seasoning to dishes, particularly those with elements of seafood. Due to its natural salty qualities, it is often used as a replacement to sea salt. I sprinkle it liberally on salads, stirfrys, omelets and the Arctic Char fish dish we enjoy every Sunday. Though an acquired taste, perhaps, I can’t get enough!

Grand Manan

NORI

  • What it is: If you’re a sushi lover, you’re already well acquainted with the thin, paper like sheets of nori that wrap around your favourite sushi roll. These sheets come raw (for the maximum health benefits) or the traditional toasted. Raw wraps will be most commonly located at your local health food store.
  • How to use it: Fill them up with any number of combinations such as tahini with avocado and veggies or make sushi rolls with quinoa/millet and your favourite additions. It works best if what you are putting in the wraps is warm as this allows the sheets to soften and adhere.

sushi

~ Above: Home-rolled avocado & mango quinoa sushi ~

KELP

  • What it is: Kelp is a brown sea algae which standard “green” chlorophyl colour is masked by a reddish, brownish hue. Brown sea veggies contain higher levels of iodine and therefore, a little goes a long way when boosting thyroid health.
  • How to use it: Soak it and slice it into strips to use on salads, stirfrys or lightly saute it in a frying pan for wraps.

 

As they are derived from the sea, toxicity is a concern but these veggies are highly beneficial when sourced organically and sustainably. It is also important to note that for the biggest boost of benefits, they should not be cooked as much of the iodine will leach into the water.

 From sushi to salads, give seaveggies a shot and get creative. Afterall, in the world of seaweeds: Anything Goes!

Suzanne Eden

 

 

 

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